cjwho:

Bridge House, Chile by Aranguiz-Bunster Arquitectos | via

The project is located in an area ​​100 x 50 meters, located in a forest of Ulmos, Melis Myrtles and other native species. It is crossed longitudinally by a stream, modeling the topography of the soil. The stream and its path through the land, generate the general idea of the project.

To cross the stream like a bridge, rescuing the light and transparent language that allows the project to be inserted into the forest without dramatically altering the major components of the environment. The impact on the forest and the stream is minimal.

In the search for the site, we chose an area clear of large trees, where the basin generates a level difference of 2.5 between the two sides. This allowed us to differentiate the supports (two concrete blocks), one as a foundation near the natural ground level (south edge) and the other as a support base on the north side.

The base contains the main access, made of a vestibule that leads to a staircase up to the main level. This volume is structured on two concrete blocks, on which three steel beams with a 12 meter span are anchored and supported. Above them is a frame of beams and double wood columns. Among the columns, double glazed windows use as center or frame the same existing structure.

Photography: Nico Saieh

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Reblogged from shar-k

libutron:

The spectacular Titan Arum

With a massive flowering structure that rises some three metres above the ground, the Titan arum is a giant among plants, scientifically named Amorphophallus titanum (Alismatales - Araceae).

These striking plants dwell only in the rainforests of western Sumatra, on steep hillsides that are 120 to 365 m above sea level.

The Titan arum has a massive inflorescence (flowering structure) consisting of a spathe (collar-like structure) wrapped around a spadix (flower-bearing spike). The spathe is the shape of an upturned bell. It is green speckled with cream on the outside, and rich crimson on the inside. It has ribbed sides and a frilled edge, and can be up to three metres in circumference.

The flowers are carried on the lower end of the greyish-yellow spadix. At the base of the spadix, within the protective chamber formed by the spathe, is a band of cream male flowers above a ring of the larger pink female flowers. When the flowers are ready for pollination, the spadix heats up and emits a nauseating smell. This stench is so bad that the Indonesians call the plant ‘the corpse flower’.

These wonders of nature are not easy to observe in the wild; they can take ten years to flower and are only open for one day.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Jeremy Holden  |  [Top]  -  [Bottom]  | Locality: Sumatra

Reblogged from shychemist