txchnologist:

Robot Self-Assembles And Walks

by Michael Keller

Roboticists have developed a flat machine that can fold itself into an operational form and take a walk. 

Built mostly from paper and polystyrene plastic that shrinks into a memorized shape when heated, the robot can assemble in around four minutes. It can crawl at roughly 2 inches per second and make turns. The work by Harvard and MIT engineers represents the first time that a robot has self-assembled and performed a function without humans needing to intervene.  

“Here we created a full electromechanical system that was embedded into one flat sheet,” said Harvard Microrobotics Lab researcher and doctoral student Sam Felton. “Imagine a ream of dozens of robotic satellites sandwiched together so that they could be sent up to space and then assemble themselves remotely once they get there–they could take images, collect data and more.”

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Reblogged from txchnologist

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Everyhing to know about a Pascal triangle of 11
In Mathematics, Pascal’s triangle is a triangular array of the binomial coefficients.
It is named after, French mathematician, Blaise Pascal in much of the Western world, although other mathematicians studied it centuries before him in countries like India, Greece, Iran, and China.
things to notice:
You will discover that there is a symmetrical pattern of numbers as you split the triangle down the middle (ignore the red)
Numbers in a pascal triangle are created by powers; as you go down the power increments: 
11^5 and 11^6 are anomalies because the digits overlap:

11 to the power the integers in a pascal triangle start and end with 1
two neighbouring numbers in the triangle add to make the number below them:                                                
the first three diagonals create patterns of numbers:                     the fourth diagonal are tetrahedral numbers
you can create Sierpinski triangle by highlighting the odd and even number:                                       
the horizontal sums in pascal’s triangle are powers of two:
in the fist image, the numbers in red are Fibonacci numbers that are found diagonally in a pascal’s triangle.
The pascal triangle.
  - [resources] - also credit to mathispun for the image.

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Everyhing to know about a Pascal triangle of 11

In Mathematics, Pascal’s triangle is a triangular array of the binomial coefficients.

It is named after, French mathematician, Blaise Pascal in much of the Western world, although other mathematicians studied it centuries before him in countries like India, Greece, Iran, and China.

things to notice:

  • You will discover that there is a symmetrical pattern of numbers as you split the triangle down the middle (ignore the red)
  • Numbers in a pascal triangle are created by powers; as you go down the power increments: 

11^5 and 11^6 are anomalies because the digits overlap:

  • 11 to the power the integers in a pascal triangle start and end with 1
  • two neighbouring numbers in the triangle add to make the number below them:                                                
  • the first three diagonals create patterns of numbers:                     the fourth diagonal are tetrahedral numbers
  • you can create Sierpinski triangle by highlighting the odd and even number:                                       
  • the horizontal sums in pascal’s triangle are powers of two:

in the fist image, the numbers in red are Fibonacci numbers that are found diagonally in a pascal’s triangle.

The pascal triangle.

  - [resources] - also credit to mathispun for the image.

Reblogged from trigonometry-is-my-bitch

neuroticthought:

skunkbear:

As Virginia Hughes noted in a recent piece for National Geographic’s Phenomena blog, the most common depiction of a synapse (that communicating junction between two neurons) is pretty simple:

Signal molecules leave one neuron from that bulby thing, float across a gap, and are picked up by receptors on the other neuron. In this way, information is transmitted from cell to cell … and thinking is possible.

But thanks to a bunch of German scientists - we now have a much more complete and accurate picture. They’ve created the first scientifically accurate 3D model of a synaptic bouton (that bulby bit) complete with every protein and cytoskeletal element.

This effort has been made possible only by a collaboration of specialists in electron microscopy, super-resolution light microscopy (STED), mass spectrometry, and quantitative biochemistry.

says the press release. The model reveals a whole world of neuroscience waiting to be explored. Exciting stuff!

You can access the full video of their 3D model here.

Credit: Benjamin G. Wilhelm, Sunit Mandad, Sven Truckenbrodt, Katharina Kröhnert, Christina Schäfer, Burkhard Rammner, Seong Joo Koo, Gala A. Claßen, Michael Krauss, Volker Haucke, Henning Urlaub, Silvio O. Rizzoli

In case you all missed it.

Reblogged from neuroticthought